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Old 01-12-2007, 03:25 PM   #21
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Hey, thanks! Nice to know someone is reading my deathless prose...

Here's a few photos of patches:


The 2nd picture is of a patch covering a hole left by the original rectangular light fixture (that one was already missing). I put a 1" grommet in there, but I think I'm actually going to cut out the center and put a plastic electrical box recessed into the roof there instead, so the wirenuts & wires aren't sticking straight out of the surface. The light fixture will cover the box. I also added a switch to this fixture, running the cable around the Astradome vent by removing the vent surround, and then down the wall in one of the wiremold channels I'd already installed.

The patch on the front covers a couple of holes where the original TV antenna was mounted. Once polished, I don't think it'll show up much.

The circular patches were made using only a compass & ruler to mark the six rivet holes. Here's a diagram from Wikipedia illustrating how to mark the holes:


They're marking a hexagon there, but I would measure in about 1/2" from the edge of the hexagon to mark the hole for the rivet. On some other smaller circular patches, I used only 3 rivets which you can obviously do just by skipping every other hole going around.

Having both left- and right-cutting aviation snips helps a lot for cutting these curves in either direction, and for cutting holes in the skin for electrical boxes. One set is not enough - pick up one of those 3-packs that cut straight, left, or right.

I installed a switch for the light above the bathroom, too (the light bulb is just for testing):

Fishing the cable through the fiberglass endcaps was easy, and I replaced a 12V outlet on the wall with the switch. I still need to make a patch and then replace that light fixture; ran out of Olympic rivets again though...

Retrofitting a switch is simple: run a cable of appropriate gauge from the fixture to a one-way light switch, connect the black & white cables to the switch (either way around), then wrap the terminals in electrical tape. At the other end, disconnect the positive cable coming from the fixture that's connected to the +12V supply, connect the white cable from the switch to the +12V supply, and connect the black cable from the switch to the positive cable for the fixture. Being 12V, you want to keep these runs as short as possible but a few extra feet isn't going to hurt. The wire gauge ampacity though should be sufficient for the fuse or circuit breaker. For example, if the 12V DC fuse or circuit breaker is 15A, 14/2 probably suffices; if it's 20A, 12/2. My trailer was all wired with 12/2 for both 12V & 110V, but I use only 15A fuses for the lighting circuits (and even that will probably be excessive once I convert to CF lighting - four 23W CF fixtures would be only be about 7A), so in some places I've used 14/2 cable for the switch wires rather than 12/2. In general using the same as the supply cable will be best though.
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Old 01-12-2007, 05:29 PM   #22
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Wow. Karma from here too!

BTW, the tubes under the belly are for storing your WBCCI flags...

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Old 01-13-2007, 02:18 PM   #23
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hello

I'm right over here in Alameda. Just wanted to say hi, congrats on the acquisition. Maybe we can meet up and compare notes sometime.
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Old 01-15-2007, 10:10 PM   #24
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small hijack here...

it hurts my head to see member "silvertwinky" and then later on in the thread see the license plate owned by another...
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Old 01-17-2007, 02:31 AM   #25
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I'd like to see another trailer, pinkflamingoes - I've literally never been in another Airstream than mine.

Holiday weekend - a perfect time to work some nice long days in a cold warehouse, right? So, I went to work on the last two feet of floor, where the bathroom was - here's the "before" photo:

You can see bad rot on both sides, and the floor right at the back completely missing, along with part of the C-channel there. Because of the lack of frame/shell connection, the bolts had pulled through the C channel as well.

I had already cut out the belly skin under this area between the frame rails, but I didn't want to cut out the rear corners of the belly skin if possible.

So, I cut off the bolts I could get to, removed as many of the channel screws as I could reach, then cut out the floor in three pieces; one piece inside the frame rails, and then the corners separately. Had some trouble with the corners with a bolt I couldn't get to. Some judicious use of the wonderbar dealt with that problem...

Using the old piece as a template, I cut two pieces of OSB to fit. Two pieces partly because to get it under the corners it seemed like doing it in two parts would be easier, but mostly because the pieces of OSB I had left over were 4'x2' (hey, when we bought the 4x8 we were in a friend's Mini, so it had to get cut down to move it). In order to keep the hole for the toilet from being on the joint, one piece was 4' wide and the other was about 3' wide, so the joint was off-center:

This needed two cleats underneath, one to connect crosswise to the old floor, and one lengthwise to join the two new pieces. Used the levelling jacks to hold the cleats in place, then screwed & glued them in place, then took out the screws once the glue had set. You can see I carefully chose the screws:

Hey, they were what I had on hand. The new piece was also bolted to the frame rails in 3 places on each side.

Because the C channel at the back had broken out in one place, and generally was in poor shape, I added a piece of angle aluminium inside the channel. Glued it to the existing channel and floor (I would hate to be the guy who has to remove this) and bolted that to the last crossmember of the frame. Seems very solid now.


This is after some filling. You can see that on the sides, outside the frame rail, I actually used a cleat on top of the floor because I had no access underneath. On one side this is under the bathtub, and on the other it's inside a cabinet, so it's not a big deal. The floor was screwed to the shell C channel around the curved corners, again because there was no access underneath.

Anyway, now it's rock solid. The shell & frame move as one at the back when you step on the bumper, and the floor is strong.

I re-insulated the wall on the curb side with two layers of foil-bubble-foil, and replaced the inside skin panel, and temporarily put the bathtub back where it came from. Looks good!

On the outside, I test-polished a couple of areas using Nuvite C and a wool polishing wheel on my drill (I intend to buy a real polisher when I get to it). Mostly I was concerned that my, hmm, vigorous efforts to remove various kinds of junk glued or riveted to the skin had caused more damage than could be polished out. But while it's not as nice as the untouched skin, even the most-damaged part of the skin (where the serial number plate & some other plaques had been) polished up pretty well:

There are some scars, and I may work on getting them out, but overall it looks pretty great. The untouched skin went to a mirror finish with hardly any work at all. If there are some scars in places, well, that's also the price of 40 years of use... In a lot of these photos you can see scuffs where I've had to remove various kinds of sealants and stickers. They polished off without much trace, alarming though they may look.

A photo of the Marinco power inlet:

Needs to be cleaned up but I think it's quite nice. I also bought hardware for the water system:

This came from West Marine - a water inlet, a hose connector for city water, and a vent for the freshwater tank, all chromed steel or brass. Until I'm further along with the plumbing I won't start cutting holes in the outside for these, though.

Another West Marine purchase was a stainless steel louver vent that I put over the hole for the cooker vent. Originally there was a removable plug; I think this vent will allow enough airflow but we'll have to see. Over the top of that will go the original ABS clamshell cover, once I've resprayed it:


I replaced the curb-side outside electrical outlet & cover with a Marinco cover and a new dual 20A outlet (it's a 12/2 20A circuit). To assist with keeping water out, after wiring & testing the outlet I filled the entire box with silicone sealant.

A friend cleaned the jalousie window frame, cleaned the glass, and then put the glass back in the frame and put on new weatherstripping:

The new fuzzy seal on the sides makes the window really hard to open or close, but hopefully it'll squash down (or I'll trim it down with a razor). But the clear vinyl weatherstrip and the silicone across the bottom make for a really good seal.

New nameplates went on front & back:


I replaced the trailer connector cable with a moulded cable, and the breakaway switch, and re-did a lot of the wiring for those and the hitch jack. That merits some additional comment. The original wiring connected the tow vehicle +12V line to the trailer battery. There are various complications from doing this and I decided not to do this, especially not using only the #10 wire in the connector. So, the two 12V systems are isolated. This poses a problem for using the hitch jack, as it has to either be powered by the tow vehicle or the trailer battery. So I wired for a switch (don't have the waterproof switch I'll need yet) to connect the jack to either the tow vehicle +12V or the trailer battery. And because I wanted to be able to turn on the running lights while the trailer is disconnected, I did the same for the lights circuit. The turn signal circuits remain simple straight-through connections. I also wired in the new breakaway switch while I was at it. I may use a small dedicated 12V battery (with a test switch & light) on the tongue for the breakaway switch, so I don't have to worry about whether the 12V breakers from the main battery are set (and for right now, so I can safely tow without any main battery at all).

For the wiring connections, I used butt splices with heatshrink tubing over them, so they should be pretty weather-resistant. I hate the intermittent electrical problems that come from corroded connections.

I did a few patches on the outside, got ready to replace the cooker vent chimney & cover by cleaning off the skin, and patched the remaining inside light fixtures. This time, I remembered to only run two wires through the patches:

You can see my very stylish light fixture there consisting of duct tape and a bare bulb. The real fixtures ought to be much nicer.

Here's a photo of where the kitchen countertop will be:

Here's the original kitchen countertop:

You can see that originally there was only one switch (for the water pump) & one outlet plate. Now there are four switches, for 2 overhead lights, one kitchen counter light in the cabinet, and for the cooker fan, and an extra outlet box. Outlets are useful!

And that's that for the weekend. Next step could be painting, but there's still more electrical work I'd like to do inside first and it's also FREEZING here in Northern California, so perhaps not the best time to paint. I think what's next is some serious plumbing work, which begins by carving open the rest of the belly skin between the frames in front of and behind the axles, and then getting some water tanks made to fit there for fresh and grey water. I think I'm probably going to get a new blackwater tank too, because I'm thinking I'll put the sewer outlet on the street side behind the wheels, rather than right at the back. I can also get a much larger black tank, possibly even extending back into the space inside the back bumper. But I have to do some measuring for that, and a lot more time crawling around on my back under the trailer first.

Things are coming together though. A solid floor throughout is a big deal, as is having the windows back in (although the stripping is not done on them). It's quite cozy in there with the heater on now.
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Old 01-17-2007, 07:52 AM   #26
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Karma to you for all your efforts and photo documentation too. Great job!!

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Old 01-17-2007, 10:06 AM   #27
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Well Documented and Very Interesting

Jacob D I look forward to every update to this thread. It amazes me how you can have so many more hours available to you during a weekend than I do. Guess you are better at organizing and planning than I am. Glad you found a warehouse to work on your trailer.
The open mesh wire hole under the trailer was under the Dometic refrigerator. It allows proper updraft of the warm air from the cooling coils to leave the back of the fridge. Also, since your trailer is a 1964, if it originally had a BayBreeze A/C unit on the roof, the mystery water lines are the original condensation drains for the runoff from the air conditioner unit. My lines are still in plance in my 65. Best of luck in your restoration/renovation/rejuvination !!!
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Old 01-17-2007, 05:03 PM   #28
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Yeah, I think those lines were there from the original A/C, which was long-ago removed & replaced with the Coleman unit that's on top. All gone now anyway along with just about every other piece of plumbing in there.

And yeah, the grill in the belly skin under the refrigerator was the air intake. I'm thinking about how to replace it, maybe a louvre grill something like
this, with a mesh screen to keep out mice & so on. There was also no kind of chimney there - just an opening into the belly pan - so I may make one myself from aluminium, with edges that overlap the floor and the belly pan to keep water from splashing directly into the belly pan.

Restoration/renovation is about right - I'm trying to stay original wherever I can, and the interior I'm hoping will actually look pretty original. I've debated painted, laminated, or metal-faced cabinetry but i think I'm probably going to go with red oak just like was used originally. Most of the cabinet frames are usable, made from solid hardwood; there's some dry rot, but it's repairable I think. Most of the plywood is not, because the veneer has delaminated off, or at the floor edges the wood is just rotted. But I think I can find similar 1/8" and 1/4" red oak plywood and I've traced all the original panels, so it's more a case of rebuilding the original cabinets than a whole new design.

I should draw up a floorplan, but it'll mostly be similar to the original:

(Mine is a 26 foot Overlander double, 2nd from the left.)

The previous owner had replaced the back gaucho with a fixed bed, which I tore out & I haven't decided what to do with that area yet.

From the back, the bathtub & sink will be the same (but repainted); the toilet will be a standalone rather than under a bench; the bathroom cabinet will be the same as original. The wardrobe will be the same and there will be a curtain from the wardrobe to the bathroom cabinet as there was originally, to separate off the bathroom.

On the curb-side, instead of having the dresser & the kitchen separated by a divider (to the right of the cooker, containing a spice cabinet), the dresser & the kitchen cabinets will have one continuous piece of countertop going from the door to the wardrobe. That should give more kitchen workspace and open up the inside a bit - the original purpose of the divider was to separate out the back bedroom, but I want to do the exact opposite. The dresser face frame will be the same though. I was thinking a solid oak countertop would go well.

I haven't decided how to handle the kitchen cabinets yet. The original construction made the extended worktop section (just inside the door) a separate cabinet to the 24" wide section behind it holding the sink & cooker, and I still have that separate cabinet, in moderately good shape but with a lot of extra holes cut in it. Then there was a face frame & partial interior frame that went where the cooker & sink are, but that whole area was wrecked. I may just start from scratch for the kitchen cabinets.

I was thinking that inside the kitchen cabinet there might be a good place to install a generator compartment/box for an Onan Microquiet 3600LP. Heavy, but it's just forward of the axles and balanced to some extent by the refrigerator and battery on the other side; there's already a patch on the exterior there from the original furnace, so building an access door would be straightforward. The exhaust would presumably run across under the belly pan and out on the street-side. If I did this, I'd probably reinforce the frame underneath the floor where the generator would sit.

My plan in the kitchen is to install only a cooktop, and no gas oven. Originally, there was a large 4-burner cooker with oven installed there, but I don't cook much. Underneath, I may put in one of those tiny dishwashers - I hate cooking, I hate doing dishes, you know how it is. Again, we'll see. I'll re-use the original sink though. On the end of the kitchen cabinet, I may install one of those nice marine propane stoves that I've seen some other people here use - again, we'll have to see how the space goes, but I like the idea of a cosy heater with a flame and a chimney there.

The overhead cabinets will all be re-used in their original locations - most of them effectively need to be rebuilt from scratch because of delamination, but I'll use them as a pattern and re-use the hardware.

On the street-side, the full-height pantry cabinet and the storage cabinet next to the fridge will be re-used. But instead of a countertop, I think I'll build a cabinet face that goes up & meets the overhead cabinet above, and use the space to install a combination microwave/convection oven and some more storage. Somewhere in that piece of cabinetry I'll be installing the new circuit breaker panel, inverter, and a battery close to the floor & axles (probably an extremely large AGM).

At the front, I'll be re-using the original swing-up table which is in great shape, and the original gaucho bed with new cushions & fabric. The frame for the gaucho needs some repairs but is usable.

Basically, not that far from the original layout & design, and hopefully using most of the same frames & style of wood veneer on the plywood panels. The light fixtures will be different but look appropriate, I hope; the interior will be repainted as I can't stand the dirty, worn, flecked-beige Zolatone; the floor will probably be marmoleum, which is not far from the original vinyl tiles although I'm thinking about underfloor insulation and maybe even heating. There'll be a lot more light switches and outlets, but that's Progress for you. But overall it should look a lot like the original interior and be re-using most of the original cabinets. Externally, other than removing the fold-out TV antenna and replacing the light bulbs with LEDs, and a modern air-conditioner, the look will be completely original.
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Old 01-17-2007, 09:48 PM   #29
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JACOB D., where'd you get the floorplans? I'd like to see them a little bigger, and more of the Sovereign on the right that's cut off. Thanks.

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Old 01-17-2007, 10:27 PM   #30
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Its from the 1964 Airstream Story brochure or catalog. It available on the VAC's web site at:

Vintage Airstream Club - Archives
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Old 01-18-2007, 01:37 AM   #31
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Progress

Jacob D So nice to see your work in progress. Keep up the posting, I am inspired by reading about your improvements. Maybe I'll get cracking on a few profects my self.
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Old 01-18-2007, 10:01 AM   #32
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Jacob,
As a fellow 64 Overlander owner, I am always looking for original usable parts. Please hang on to anything you are not going to reuse and PM me if you would be interested in selling it. Good luck on your project, I will continue to follow with interest.

Mark
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Old 01-22-2007, 06:19 PM   #33
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Thanks! For parts, yes, I have a good pile of them in my house right now (actually in my bedroom... ah, the bachelor life) and when I'm sure I won't need them, what I'll probably do is start listing them on ebay with a $1 starting bid & no reserve, and post a note here or in classifieds (depending on site rules, I haven't checked). That way for weird stuff that isn't really worth anything but someone needs it for their particular project, they can get it for a nominal $1, and for anything that turns out to be rare I can get a decent market rate without worrying about setting fair prices. But for now I'm still not sure what I'm using or not, and I'd like to sell it all in one fell swoop so people can combine shipping.

Only worked a little this weekend on Saturday - put up a triple-LNB DirecTV satellite dish for one of the friends helping me with the trailer on Sunday, which took longer than expected because I really had no idea what I was doing. And then afterwards I had to play games on her Wii until 1am to recover from all the exertion.

Okay, but on the trailer I was mostly underneath cutting out belly skin. I haven't tried jacking the trailer yet so this was with the usual 12" or so of ground clearance under there. I was cutting the skin with an angle grinder with a cutoff wheel which works well but is unwieldy.

Basically I cut out the curb-side half of the belly skin from the back to just behind the axles, and from the front to just in front of the axles. This is to get access to the area where I plan to put the fresh & grey water tanks, under the floor. What was in there was a lot of dirty fiberglass and a LOT of dirt - like many, many pounds of fine, red dust, most of which fell on me as I was cutting. Good times. Luckily I had bought a full-face shield which together with a dust mask made it bearable, as long as I swept up the dirt every so often. I tore out all the ragged fiberglass I could get to, but some of it was still pristine and not in an area where I was going to put the tanks, so I just left that stuff on there for now.

I really got what people meant when they say "drop" the belly skin this time - you can cut basically along the frame rails and remove large, flat rectangular pieces from between the rails, while leaving the pieces that curve up to the floor intact and still get access to all of the floor by bending those curved pieces to vertical. Where I repaired the floor by the door, I cut out most of the curving section too to get access to the floor, and that'll be a pain to replace.

After removing that side of the skin, I could get to the original furnace ducting, which hadn't been used in a long, long time. Getting it out was a pain involving ripping off duct tape, drilling out rivets, and cutting with a cutoff wheel, along with a lot of brute force, but eventually all 30lbs or so of it came out. After that I made small rectangular patches for the duct holes in the floor, and cleats to go underneath to hold them in place, then glued them in (again using a levelling jack as a clamp to hold the cleats in place while screwing the pieces together). So now the floor has no large holes in it except behind the fridge. The main goal here was not structural - the holes were small enough to be unimportant once an engineered floor was on top - but to keep out water. And to prevent me tripping over the holes and losing things down them until I get said engineered floor.

So here's where the black water tank will go (same as the old position, but almost certainly a new tank):

That's right at the back, and the tank will probably be as deep as the frame rails (which are extended down a little there - it's about 4.5" vertically from the floor to the bottom of the frame). The width is about 54", and I haven't decided on the length yet. Potentially, I could extend the tank all the way back to the bumper from that crossmember, maybe 30-35" in total which would be a 30-35 gallon black tank at the cost of losing the bumper compartment. Still thinking about that one.

Here's where the fresh water tank will go:

This is just in front of the axles. Each of those spaces between crossmembers is about 23" long. Here I think I could safely extend the tank 4-6" below the belly skin and still have a pretty good ground clearance (especially with new axles), much like the new Airstreams. So I have a few options there. Assuming I remove the angle piece that runs lengthwise down the middle of the floor, I have a space that's about 5" tall. Without removing the crossmember, I could have a tank about 54" by 10" by 23" in that space, which is about 53 gallons (around 450lbs). If I removed the crossmember but stayed above the frame, I could have a tank about 54" by 5" by 47", which would give me about the same of course, 54 gallons or so. Or if I removed the crossmember and had a deep tank extending below the frame rails, it could be anywhere up to 100 gallons or more, weighing 800lbs. Yikes. That's probably a little too large, but I'm leaning towards removing the crossmember rather than having a 23" long tank that's very tall. Better to go 2" below the frame and be 36" or more long, I think.

The same goes for the location of the greywater tank:

This is just behind the axles and the space constraints are the same, and I'll probably put identical tanks in both locations. The grey tank has the additional need to drain, of course, but even at 5" below the frame that should be okay. I plan on putting the drain outlet on the street-side, probably a couple of feet back from the wheels, underneath the belly skin. Basically right off of the grey tank to reduce the need for a drain slope and keep overall ground clearance to however far the grey tank extends from the belly skin.

The drain slope from the black tank should be okay - perhaps 5 feet dropping maybe 3-5" over that. Routing the drain line might be tricker, as of course there are crossmembers in the way. Perhaps it can go all the way underneath the belly skin, or perhaps the crossmembers can be modified to let it pass through them.

To hold the tanks in place, I think I'm going to have a metal shop fabricate frames that can be bolted to the bottom of the frame rails. When I have plans for those I'll post them, obviously it depends on how deep and long the tanks are.

Whatever size the tanks are, it seems likely that I'll have them custom-made to make the most of the space they're in. I haven't seen any tanks that are really all that close to the right size - maybe this one but it's 24" long, which would require removing a crossmember anyway and at that point I'd rather it was longer.

I need to take some more measurements and draw up a side view of the trailer with the various choices drawn to judge the impact on approach/departure angles & so on.

I plan on installing tank heaters and a small amount of insulation around the tanks to survive freezing conditions, and then perhaps running the new belly skin over the tanks too to protect the insulation.

Unfortunately, the original propane line (black iron, running down one side) is going to be in the way and needs to be moved further to the side, and because it has a T in it that goes off as iron as well before splitting to be the cooker & furnace copper pipes, the whole thing probably needs to be replaced. That's really unfortunate but it looks to be unavoidable.

To do:
  • Remove the remaining belly skin from those areas.
  • Remove the remaining junk fiberglass from underneath.
  • Measure the spaces exactly and decide on tank shape.
  • Decide on the location of tank fittings and routing for drain pipes.
  • Order new tanks.
  • Order tank heaters.
  • Design the frames for the tanks and have them fabricated.
  • Remove the propane line, and re-route the trailer-connector wires that go through the space.
  • Remove the centreline reinforcement and any crossmembers that need to get out of the way; possibly move or beef up existing frame crossmembers.
  • Install tanks, heaters, frames, insulation, and connect up drain pipes.
  • Test the drainage from the black & grey pipes.
  • Replace belly skin and any under-floor insulation I put in (still undecided on whether to use any).
  • Replace all the propane lines.
  • Do the above-floor plumbing.
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Old 01-22-2007, 06:44 PM   #34
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Here's a very crude diagram of the planned tank layout:
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Old 01-23-2007, 12:37 AM   #35
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This is a fairly rough block diagram of the fresh & hot water plumbing:

I probably also need to use braided stainless hoses to connect to the faucets & water heater. The water heater is going to be an RV500 tankless, so no bypass plumbing is required.

I don't know much about plumbing but this seems fairly safe. The 1/2" tubing everywhere may be overkill. I'm planning to use Flair-It fittings & PEX tubing wherever I can.
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Old 01-23-2007, 02:09 AM   #36
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Everything looks pretty good.

What's the point of the three way valve after the pump? The pump has a check valve built into it so you don't a have to isolate it from the city inlet.

Replace it with a Tee and move it in front of the pump so you can select the tank or a hose that can draw in antifreeze for winterizing.

Also get a city inlet with a built in check valve or add one right after so you water won't pump right out of it when using the fresh water tank supply.

Also you should have hot and cold line drains at both ends of the trailer. Ie. the bathroom and kitchen. You can tee them together through valves and have only one pipe going out the bottom if you want.

Just my thoughts.
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Old 01-23-2007, 07:25 AM   #37
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Looks like the water heater needs have output flow to the sinks and shower. I adjusted your diagram. All else looks good with the notations from Tim above.

Brad
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Old 01-23-2007, 10:03 AM   #38
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Join us at the NorCal Rally, Casini Ranch, April 27-29

You may want to hook up with PinkFlamingoes and come visit us at the Casini Ranch (Russian River) NorCal Rally April 27-29. It's fairly close to you.
I haven't read through all of your postings, but I'm sure you'll find it very fun and interesting to look through our trailers. We usually have an open-house viewing of our trailers on Saturday.

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Casini Ranch NorCal Rally April '2005
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Old 01-23-2007, 03:51 PM   #39
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I'd love to stop by the rally - I seriously doubt my trailer will be road-ready in any way by then, but I could drive up to visit & take the tour for sure.

And good plumbing points, thanks! If the city water is connected before the pump (i.e. teed into the fresh-water tank line) and the pump is turned off, will the pump let (regulated) city-pressure water through? And I guess I would need a check valve on the fresh-water tank to stop it being filled by city-pressure water.

Also a good point that I can tee together drains - the previous owner or Airstream had many (many) separate drain lines each with their own hole through the floor and shell. I'll probably reduce that to two or three.

Ordered more LEDs from superbrightleds.com - 6 amber 24-LED PCBs to do the other amber teardrop markers, 3 red 36-LED PCBs to do the 3 red clearance lights on the back (they don't have a 24-LED version), and a 3-LED white light I'm going to try out on the license plate light. Other than that I like LEDs, I also want to be able to run these off the battery when parked without significant current draw. I'm also going to try some lights to illuminate the Airstream nameplates on front & back with white LEDs when parked (obviously not when towing).
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Old 01-23-2007, 04:10 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacob D.
... If the city water is connected before the pump (i.e. teed into the fresh-water tank line) and the pump is turned off, will the pump let (regulated) city-pressure water through? And I guess I would need a check valve on the fresh-water tank to stop it being filled by city-pressure water.
...
Definitely protect your fresh water tank from city water pressure!

Also, the water may go through the pump, but not if it's a positive displacement type. I know on my SureFlow it won't go backwards, but I don't if that's because it has a check valve (don't think so) or because it's a positive displacement pump.

Zep
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